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TitleCodeSemesterLevelAssociatesDescription
Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental ScienceGEG4002Full year4No

Ideas and Practice in Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module equips students with the skills and understanding needed to study for a degree in Geography or Environmental Science. It is built around three strands of learning activity. (i) In week 1 of Semester A students will follow an intensive 'Investigating London' programme of field-based activities exploring geographical and environmental issues in the city that they have come to study in. This will involve visiting different parts of the city and working with a range of external organizations to carry out group exercises and mini research projects. The work will also provide opportunities to get to know fellow students and staff. (ii) Weekly or fortnightly tutorials throughout the first and second semester will introduce students to study skills (such reading, note-taking and referencing, essay writing, recognising and responding to feedback, making effective presentations, preparing for examinations), as well as providing a forum for reflecting on topics and themes dealt with in other modules. (iii) A programme of six weeks of lectures in Semester B will critically explore ideas and philosophies underpinning EITHER human geography OR physical geography and environmental science. The assessment will take the form of four 1500 word essays. To help develop essay writing skills, students will produce drafts of essays that will be submitted to their tutor for formative feedback. These will will then be revised before final submission and assessment

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 3 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 10: Friday 3 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 16: Tuesday 3 pm - 4 pm

Geography in the WorldGEG4003Semester 14No

Geography in the World

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Catherine Nash
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module focuses on the nature and usefulness of geography as an academic subject in relation to the application of geographical knowledge and skills by academic geographers and by students in their future careers. It provides an understanding of academic geography as both engaged with the world and as situated within wider society. This includes considering the use and value of academic geography in society and focusing on how to put geographical skills and knowledge to use in the future careers of undergraduate geographers. The module provides a contextual understanding of the origins of geography as an academic subject, and reflects on geography as a wider set of popular knowledges, interests and concerns. It addresses key geographical practices such as fieldwork and mapping; explores questions of the relevance and application of academic geography; and considers efforts to build bridges between school, popular and academic geography. The module also provides a foundation for undergraduate geographers in planning their future careers as geography graduates. The module aims to encourage a strong geographical identity and sense of shared identification with a diverse professional and popular geographical communit.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 11 am
  • Semester 1: Thursday 4 pm - 5 pm

Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental ScientistsGEG4004Full year4No

Research Methods for Geographers and Environmental Scientists

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Alastair Owens
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces geography and environmental science students to key quantitative and qualitative research methods and GIS. These include mapping, spatial analysis, interviewing, questionnaire design, survey methods, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Lectures are combined with regular computer lab-based practical sessions in order to understand the theories behind different methods and learn how they can be applied in geographical and environmental research. As part of this practical element, students will receive training in the use of MS Excel, IBM SPSS Statistics and ArcGIS to manipulate and analyse data.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12: Tuesday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 11: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 9 am - 10 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Friday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 11 am - 2 pm

People and the EnvironmentGEG4005Semester 24Yes

People and the Environment

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to key environmental issues from both a scientific and economic, social and cultural perspective. Students will gain an understanding of the main global environmental systems and how these impact and are impacted by human activity. They will also gain an appreciation of the range of approaches within geography that can be employed to study the relationship between people and their environment.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Reinventing BritainGEG4106Semester 24No

Reinventing Britain

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caron Lipman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

It is now widely accepted that over the last three decades Britain has experienced a series of profound changes across its economic, social, cultural and political landscapes. This module examines some of the key elements of this reinvention of Britain since the 1970s in the context of an increasingly global economy. It explores a range of topics including the uneven geographies of deindustrialisation and crisis; Britain's new service economy; gender shifts in employment and unemployment; migrant labour; place-based competition and new forms of urban regeneration. These various dimensions of Britain's contemporary reinvention will be discussed in the wider context of changing philosophies and instruments of government policy intervention. A key focus will be on the North East of England: a region that has experienced profound social and economic change. The module will be delivered through an innovative mix of seminars, lectures and field teaching. It includes a compulsory five day residential field course based in Durham in the North East of England (students will be required to pay some of the costs). The module is open to Associate Students.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 10 am - 11 am

Global WorldsGEG4112Semester 24No

Global Worlds

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Cathy Mcilwaine
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will introduce students to a range of core issues affecting the world around them from economic, cultural and social perspectives with a particular focus on the importance of global-local relations revolving around inequality and justice. It will explore a range of debates surrounding the interrelationships between globalisation and international development from historical and contemporary viewpoints as well as the nature and politics of identities in relation to nationalism, diaspora, landscape and exclusion . Students will also be introduced to the relationships between health, place and care.

Assessment: 80.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 5 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 5 pm - 6 pm

Fieldwork in Physical Geography and Environmental ScienceGEG4204Semester 24No

Fieldwork in Physical Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to fieldwork skills for physical geographers and environmental scientists. You will be able to use a range of field techniques to investigate the physical landscape, soils and sediments, river systems and hydrology and also the impact of and management of human activity on the natural environment. The module is delivered through lectures, laboratory/classroom practical exercises and fieldwork exercises, both actual and virtual (e.g. using Google Earth). Actual fieldwork may take place on-campus, off-campus on day trips, during a residential field trip, or any combination of these.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Practical
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Earth Surface ScienceGEG4209Semester 14Yes

Earth Surface Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Carr
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

What makes planet Earth so remarkable? Our planet is shaped by many interacting environmental systems operating from atomic through to global scales. Understanding the science of these systems is central to developing an advanced knowledge of the physical environment. This module explores fundamental Earth surface systems (e.g. tectonics, atmosphere & oceans, landscape development, climate change), focusing on core concepts, processes, their significance within a broader environmental context and their relevance to the human species.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 4: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am

Geographies of Health and DiseaseGEG4402Semester 24Yes

Geographies of Health and Disease

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Taylor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module introduces students to the study of human health and disease (conceived as both an individual, a community and a population attribute) from an historical and geographical perspective. It places particular emphasis on exploring the forms of geographical unevenness in contemporary human health and the social, political and economic processes that have shaped this. The module is divided into three parts, each of which familiarises students with current debates in the geographies of health and provides an introduction to core themes and ideas: Geographies of Health; Society, Culture and Health; and Geographies of Biomedicine. The course is thematically organized but introduces core case studies, drawn from contemporary global health concerns, into each lecture.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Transferable Skills for GeographersGEG4444Full year4No

Transferable Skills for Geographers

Credits: 0.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 4
Timetable:

Geographical Information SystemsGEG5102Full year5Yes

Geographical Information Systems

Credits: 30.0
Contact:
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the basic principles of GIS and their application in modelling geographical realities. It is practically based and a requirement of the module is to become proficient in the operation and use of the GIS software - ARCVIEW. The main components of the module include defining the key elements of a GIS, basic cartographic principles, elementary database management, error and data quality issues, statistical analysis of spatial data, and presentation and outputs from GIS. The module will emphasise the applications of GIS both realised, within the module, and potential, within the wider geographical remit.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Geographical Research in PracticeGEG5103Full year5No

Geographical Research in Practice

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr William Taylor
Overlap: GEG5211
Prerequisite: None

Research is a critical part of what geographers do and this module develops research skills through practice. In Semester A, students will attend weekly lectures that introduce key qualitative research techniques. In addition, students will work on an action research project in the local community to develop these skills and produce a final report to summarise their findings. In both Semesters A and B, these research foundations are further developed through tutorials that are designed to prepare students to do their own IGS.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 5 pm

Geographical Research in PracticeGEG5103BSemester 25No

Geographical Research in Practice

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr William Taylor
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed for students studying away from Queen Mary in Semester 1 and who would like to prepare for GEG6000 Independent Geographical Study (IGS) in Semester 2 when they return. The module is delivered through tutorials/small group teaching and focuses on equipping students with the knowledge and skills required to design an independent piece of research (the IGS). The programme focuses on how to select a feasible research topic, review academic literature, justify and select appropriate research methodology, make pragmatic decisions about research access, sites and timeline, consider the ethical dimensions of research and make appropriate risk assessments.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

Urban Futures: Los Angeles and Las VegasGEG5112Semester 25No

Urban Futures: Los Angeles and Las Vegas

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jon May
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5127

This module uses a focus on the urban regions of Los Angeles and Las Vegas to examine a number of themes of more general concern to those interested in the development of the contemporary city and its possible futures, namely: rising inequality and segregation at the local and regional scale; changing urban forms; and the re-configuration of public space. By examining these trends through a single regional lens attention is drawn to the ways in which social, cultural, economic and political processes work together to produce new urban geographies of inclusion and exclusion, subordination and resistance. Examining these processes as they come together in Los Angeles and Las Vegas is significant because of the way in which these regions have been taken as paradigmatic of recent urban development more generally. Examining these processes on the ground during a residential field class enables a clearer understanding of these geographies and of whether or not Los Angeles and Las Vegas are indeed paradigmatic in some way. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Health, Biomedicine and SocietyGEG5113Full year5Yes

Health, Biomedicine and Society

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The overall aim of the module is to provide a critical introduction to the study of health and biomedical geography. The module will focus attention on the so-called post-medical turn, which occurred in response to wider debates taking place in geography in the 1990s. The importance of this moment is that it resulted in a rejection of a narrowly defined biomedical model and an associated over-emphasis on positivist approaches to the study of health, health care, and disease. While sympathetic with the outcome of the post-medical turn ¿ for example, its broader engagement with social theory, emphasis on health and place, and its concern to promote post-positivist research - the module will also offer a counter-critique through its focus on biomedical issues that were largely ignored.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Health, Biomedicine and SocietyGEG5113ASemester 15Yes

Health, Biomedicine and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to contemporary issues relating to health and biomedical geography. The module is organised into two sections split over two semesters of which this is Semester One.

Semester One: This section of the module explores the relationship between health and biotechnology and asks what a critical geographical perspective can add to current debates about the future of biomedicine and how biomedicine is changing and challenging the way we think about geography. The module covers three main areas: biomedical research, biomedicine in health practice and the social and cultural implications of biomedicine. This section looks at how innovations in medical technology - such as in-vitro fertilisation, organ donation and genetic testing - create unique social, political and ethical challenges and how geographers can contribute to the debates about these technologies by highlighting how their impact varies throughout and across different social and spatial contexts.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Health, Biomedicine and SocietyGEG5113BSemester 25Yes

Health, Biomedicine and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Tim Brown
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to contemporary issues relating to health and biomedical geography. The module is organised into two sections split over two semesters of which this is Semester Two.

Semester Two: This section of the module explores the fundamental determinants of poor health, death and disease in modern developed societies from an ecological/eco-social perspective. Fundamental geographical and epidemiological concepts in the analysis of socio-environmental risks to individual and population health will be introduced. Specific topics will include: sick populations; equity, socio-environmental justice and health inequality; social capital, networks and cohesion; income inequality; the organisation of built space; racism, segregation and discrimination as determinants of a wide range of health behaviours and outcomes including, diet, obesity, suicide and psychological health.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

Cultural GeographiesGEG5126Semester 15Yes

Cultural Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Regan Koch
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides an introduction to the field of cultural geography. It draws on examples both historical and contemporary, in the UK and beyond, to demonstrate how spaces, places and landscapes are laden with meaning. It shows that culture is not something that is fixed, but rather constructed through relations with different people, places, ideas, objects and practices. The module therefore helps student understand and interpret matters of culture critically, with careful attention to plurality, complexity and power. Taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, topics include: an introduction to cultural geography; landscape: meaning, power and identity; interpreting cultural representations; more-than-representational geographies; geographies of embodiment and mobility; cultural geographies of food; emerging cultural landscapes and politics; tensions and new directions in cultural geography . The module is assessed by 100% coursework: an interpretive coursework exercise (2000 words) and a 3000 word coursework essay.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 50.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 9 am - 11 am

Society and SpaceGEG5127Semester 25Yes

Society and Space

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jon May
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Drawing mainly, though not wholly, on examples from the UK, this module explores the social geographies of class, gender, race and ethnicity, and sexuality at a variety of scales. Taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, topics include: Changing class relations in the British countryside; rural poverty and homelessness; racial inequality and changing ethnic identities in the UK; London's new migrant division of labour; gentrification; homelessness and the politics of public space; the gendering of urban space; and the geographies of sexuality. The module is assessed by 100% coursework: a field walk and 2000 word report in the form of a Wikipedia entry, and 3000 word course work essay.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 16: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Spaces of Uneven DevelopmentGEG5128Semester 25Yes

Spaces of Uneven Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will interrogate how development geography has evolved as a discipline, discourse and practice since its inception. Beginning with a set of lectures which will introduce students to mainstream and radical theorizations of development, the module will present ongoing and emerging research agendas around issues of restructuring, employment, gender, finance, migration and related policy interventions.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Economic GeographiesGEG5129Semester 15Yes

Economic Geographies

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Erica Pani
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG4112

This module aims to explore the diversity and inequalities of economic development experiences globally, as well as within countries and among nations. It will examine some core issues in relation to how economic concerns of capital, production, exchange, valuation and consumption play out in practice with reference to a range of different cases studies. It will also address ongoing debates around economic crisis and complex socioeconomic geographies of post-recessionary growth.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Earth System CyclesGEG5203Full year5Yes

Earth System Cycles

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module takes an integrative approach to the understanding of material cycles that are fundamental to the functioning of the Earth system: the hydrological cycle, the carbon cycle, nutrient cycles, and cycles of human-derived organic and metal pollutants. Emphasis is placed on understanding the key processes within each cycle and the links between the different cycles. The framework for understanding the cycles is the catchment-coastal continuum, and detailed consideration is given to the cascading of water and sediment through this system. Key hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological processes involved in the cycles are also explored, partly through data interpretation exercises. The course considers the role of humans in the cycles and how this role can be evaluated at local to global scales. The course is delivered through lectures, workshops, practicals, and seminars.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Earth Systems CyclesGEG5203ASemester 15Yes

Earth Systems Cycles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Cycles of water, sediments and nutrients determine how the Earth functions but all are increasingly being affected by human activities. This module examines these key material cycles, and those of human-made pollutants such as metals, fertilizers and pesticides and reviews how hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological processes characterise each of the cycles. Stores and transfers of water, carbon, nutrients and pollutants are considered from the hillslopes, through rivers and wetlands to the estuaries and the coast, along the catchment-coast continuum, and the impact of humans is examined at the local, regional and global scales. The focus will be on the hydrological cycle and the transfer and stores of sediments.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Earth Systems CyclesGEG5203BSemester 25Yes

Earth Systems Cycles

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Cycles of water, sediments and nutrients determine how the Earth functions but all are increasingly being affected by human activities. This module examines these key material cycles, and those of human-made pollutants such as metals, fertilizers and pesticides and reviews how hydrological, biogeochemical and ecological processes characterise each of the cycles. Stores and transfers of water, carbon, nutrients and pollutants are considered from the hillslopes, through rivers and wetlands to the estuaries and the coast, along the catchment-coast continuum, and the impact of humans is examined at the local, regional and global scales. Following an introduction to the chemistry of the environment, the focus will be on carbon, nutrient and pollutant processes.

Assessment: 60.0% Coursework, 40.0% Examination
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am

Global Environmental ChangeGEG5206Full year5Yes

Global Environmental Change

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will examine the rates and magnitude of global environmental change over different time-scales, and develop understanding of the significance of these changes for landscapes, ecological systems and the human species. The module will introduce the operation of the global climate system and the mechanisms of climate change, evidence for climate change during the Late Quaternary and the methods used to date environmental change. The landscape and ecological responses to climate change will be examined through geomorphological, sedimentary and peatland archives. The module will conclude with a discussion of the role of environmental change in the biological evolution and global migrations of humans and the rise and fall of society and civilization and a discussion of the present threat posed by climate change. The module includes a compulsory residential field trip (additional costs will apply) which will enable students to gain practical experience of investigating evidence of past environmental change.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm

Global Environmental ChangeGEG5206ASemester 15Yes

Global Environmental Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will examine the rates and magnitude of global environmental change over different time-scales, and develop understanding of the significance of these changes for landscapes, ecological systems and the human species. The module will introduce evidence for climate change during the Late Quaternary and the methods used to date environmental change. The landscape and ecological responses to climate change will be examined through geomorphological, sedimentary and peatland archives. The module includes a compulsory residential field trip (additional costs will apply) which will enable students to gain practical experience of investigating evidence of past environmental change.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Global Environmental ChangeGEG5206BSemester 25Yes

Global Environmental Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will examine the rates and magnitude of global environmental change over different time-scales, and develop understanding of the significance of these changes for landscapes, ecological systems and the human species. The module will introduce evidence for climate change during the Late Quaternary and the methods used to date environmental change. The landscape and ecological responses to climate change will be examined through geomorphological, sedimentary and peatland archives.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework, 20.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 2 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 3 pm - 4 pm

Research Strategies in Physical EnvironmentsGEG5211Full year5No

Research Strategies in Physical Environments

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Geraldene Wharton
Overlap: GEG5103
Prerequisite: GEG4208

A series of interrelated lectures, seminars, tutorials, fieldwork and practicals which will give students a thorough overview of field and laboratory techniques available and hands-on experience with the most common ones. A detailed booklet will be available at the start of the module.

Contents will reflect the expertise of physical geography staff, but will include at least the following: Techniques and skills in: fluvial geomorphology, hydrochemistry and pollution, Quaternary geomorphology, glacial and periglacial geomorphology, palaeoecology and environmental history. Furthermore: the use of statistics, reviewing scientific literature, risk assessment.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lab
  • Semester 1: Friday 12 pm - 4 pm

Research Strategies in Physical Environments 2GEG5211BSemester 26No

Research Strategies in Physical Environments 2

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides training in research methods appropriate to physical geography and environmental science, with a particular focus on preparation for Level 6 Independent Geographical Study and Project in Environmental Science modules, including the development of an agreed research topic, the planning and execution of a pilot study and the preparation and submission of a research proposal.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Environmental Management ApplicationsGEG5219Full year5No

Environmental Management Applications

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5203 GEG5206

This module will build on fundamental process based learning that students will have developed through either GEG5203 or GEG5206, applying this knowledge to a range of management issues. The module will be based around seminars which introduce students to methods, concepts and frameworks for environmental monitoring, assessment and restoration followed by a field trip to S. Florida. On the field trip students will explore the physical, environmental, political and economic issues surrounding a range of restoration and management schemes in S. Florida which may include fluvial (e.g. Kissimmee River), terrestrial (e.g. the Everglades), estuarine (e.g. Tampa bay), coastal (barrier Gulf Coast) and marine (e.g. Florida Bay and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary) environments. During the field trip students will meet with a range of end-users, stakeholders, and practitioners working in Environmental Management. As part of the assessment process students will produce a concise factsheet aimed at A level/first year students and participate in a question and answer session on a specialised topic with their peers and professionals. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 8, 9, 10, 11: Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Digital CartographyGEG5221Semester 15No

Digital Cartography

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will build on existing basic mapping and map-reading skills introduced in GEG4004 and GEG4204. Teaching will be centred on digital techniques that all represent key skills in Physical Geography and Environmental Science: Digital Cartography, integrated with basic remote sensing skills, map-making and map interpretation are the basic requirements for displaying and interrogating spatial data. Lectures will introduce the theories underlying cartographic principles and best practice, and laboratory practicals will be used to provide ¿hands-on¿ experience of Adobe Illustrator, the market-leading software for designing maps and other illustrations (such as sedimentological logs, diagrams etc.), and other key software packages essential in the handling of digital data. In addition, a seminar discussion will be used to test the understanding of the subject matter and to discuss key issues in digital cartography.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Monday 11 am - 1 pm

Geographical Information Systems, Remote Sensing and ModellingGEG5222Semester 25No

Geographical Information Systems, Remote Sensing and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dave Horne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will build on existing basic mapping, map-reading and GIS skills introduced in GEG4004 and GEG4204. A Geographical Information Systems (GIS) component (approximately 40% of the module content) will focus on the use of ArcGIS, DIVA-GIS and Google Earth software and their applications in physical geography and environmental science. A Remote Sensing (RS) component (approx. 30% of the module content) will introduce key concepts in environmental RS and image analysis. A modelling component (approx. 30% of the module content) will introduce aspects of environmental and climate modelling. For all three components, lectures will provide a theoretical and applications-based context for the experience and skill acquired through hands-on practical exercises. Supplementary e-learning resources will facilitate enhanced student learning outside scheduled classes. The weighting of the assessments is intended to reflect the learning opportunities offered by feedback on the first two assignments (rather than the proportions of the content devoted to the three main topics), with the third and final assignment being worth 40% compared to 30% each for the first two.

Assessment: 85.0% Coursework, 15.0% Practical
Level: 5
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 11 am - 12 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 12 pm - 2 pm

An Independent Geographical StudyGEG6000Full year6No

An Independent Geographical Study

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5103 GEG5211

As part of the assessment of GEG5103, GEG5301 or GEG5211 students will be required to submit a proposal for an IGS topic. Once this has been agreed, students complete the research and writing involved as directed by their supervisor and outlined in the IGS Handbook.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation, .0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Readings in Geography: Geographies of NatureGEG6003Semester 26No

Readings in Geography: Geographies of Nature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathryn Yusoff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The Geographies of Nature: Readings module allow students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the ideas and issues that they are studying within the GEG6128 Geographies of Nature module by undertaking a piece of assessment based on independent reading and research that is supported through two small-group seminars and one-to-one tutorials. The Geographies of Nature: Readings module can be undertaken instead of an alternative Level 6 option module. Students will focus on one area of the Geographies of Nature sub-discipline to develop an independent research essay that addresses a key theoretical or methodological question in the field. Students will be assessed via a 6,000 word report and the essay will include a substantive literature review of the chosen area. The module must be taken in conjunction with GEG6128 Geographies of Nature

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Readings in Geography: Geographies of DemocracyGEG6005Semester 26No

Readings in Geography: Geographies of Democracy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Readings in Geography: Geographies of Democracy allow students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the ideas and issues that they are studying within the GEG6133 Geographies of Democracy by undertaking a piece of assessment based on independent reading and research that is supported through two small-group seminars and one-to-one tutorials. The module can be undertaken instead of an alternative Level 6 option module. Students will focus on one area of the Geographies of Democracy sub-discipline to develop an independent research essay that addresses a key theoretical or methodological question in the field. Students will be assessed via a 6,000 word report and the essay will include a substantive literature review of the chosen area. The module must be taken in conjunction with GEG6133 Geographies of Democracy.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and SocietyGEG6006Semester 26No

Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kerry Holden
Overlap: GEG6134
Prerequisite: None

The Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society module will allow students to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the ideas and issues that they are studying within the GEG6134 Geography, Technology and Society module by undertaking a piece of assessment based on independent reading and research that is supported through two small-group seminars and one-to-one tutorials. The Readings in Geography: Geography, Technology and Society module can be undertaken instead of an alternative Level 6 option module. Students will focus on one area of the Geography, Technology and Society sub-discipline to develop an independent research essay that addresses a key theoretical or methodological question in the field. Students will be assessed via a 6,000 word report and the essay will include a substantive literature review of the chosen area. The module must be taken in conjunction with GEG6134 Geography, Technology and Society

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

Gender and DevelopmentGEG6101Semester 16No

Gender and Development

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Cathy Mcilwaine
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines the geographies of gender roles, relations and identities in countries of the Global South. As well as exploring the theoretical approaches to gender and development, and especially feminist thought, the module also examines a series of axes of diversity in relation to women's and men's lives in the South. In addition, it examines changing social and economic aspects of development on women's and men's lives in relation to household transformations, population growth and mobility, poverty, employment and welfare, violence, and development policy and practice. The module approaches these issues from both theoretical and empirical perspectives, with a particular focus on the experiences of women and men at the grassroots.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Wednesday 9 am - 10 am
  • Semester 1: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Urban FuturesGEG6112Semester 26No

Urban Futures

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Jon May
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5127

This module uses a focus on the urban regions of Los Angeles and Las Vegas to examine a number of themes of more general concern to those interested in the development of the contemporary city and its possible futures, namely: rising inequality and segregation at the local and regional scale; changing urban forms; and the re-configuration of public space. By examining these trends through a single regional lens attention is drawn to the ways in which social, cultural, economic and political processes work together to produce new urban geographies of inclusion and exclusion, subordination and resistance. Examining these processes as they come together in Los Angeles and Las Vegas is significant because of the way in which these regions have been taken as paradigmatic of recent urban development more generally. Examining these processes on the ground during a residential field class enables a clearer understanding of these geographies and of whether or not Los Angeles and Las Vegas are indeed paradigmatic in some way. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 3 pm - 5 pm

Victorian London: Economy, Society and CultureGEG6117Semester 16Yes

Victorian London: Economy, Society and Culture

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Alastair Owens
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This specialist level six module explores the historical geography of Victorian London. It focuses primarily on the economic, social and cultural histories of nineteenth-century London, emphasising the role of class, gender and race in shaping the geographies metropolitan life. As such the module engages with a number of broader theoretical debates in urban studies and allied disciplines. The historical geography of the metropolis itself is explored thematically by focusing on some of the real and imagined landscapes and spaces within which Victorian Londoners lived, worked and played. These include: the East End and the West End, economic spaces, domestic spaces (including the slums and the suburbs), institutional spaces, imperial landscapes, streets, parks, music halls, pubs, gentleman&s clubs and other sites of leisure. Not only does this provide an innovative structure and focus for the module, it also enables the spatiality of Victorian London life to be highlighted. While taking this approach, the module also provides an account of the important historical changes that occurred in London over the nineteenth century. There will be three field walks around the West End, East End and Victoria Park. Visits to the Geffrye Museum and the London Archaeological Archive and Research Centre are also planned.

Prerequisite: This module normally requires GEG5110 Society, Culture and Space as a prerequite. However, other level 5 modules in social sciences and history may be accepted as an alternative - please liaise with the module coordinator if this will affect you.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 9 am - 11 am

Development Futures: Mumbai UnboundGEG6120Semester 16No

Development Futures: Mumbai Unbound

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Kavita Datta
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5111

This innovative fieldwork-based module is unique among Geography departments in the UK. Operationalised thorugh an empirical focus on urban change in Mumbai, India's financial capital, it challenges the long-standing academic division between 'economic' and 'development' geography, and instead builds an alternative hybrid approach. The module will focus on a series of core themes: (i) Mumbai's dual economy, in which low-end, low-paid service providers underpin the success of high profile multinational corporations; (ii) gender and work in India's high profile Business Process Outsourcing - IT-Enabled Services Industry; (iii) the growth of India's new middle classes, their patterns of consumption and the inscriptions of these in the urban fabric; (iv) poverty and hope in Mumbai's slums, focusing around informal economies of survival amongst different social and ethnic groups in Dharavi and NGO projects seeking to improve well-being and quality of life within Mumbai's slums. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 9, 10, 11: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Geographies of NatureGEG6128Semester 26Yes

Geographies of Nature

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kathryn Yusoff
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Understandings of the "where, what and who" of nature have been radically rethought in light of global environmental change, theoretical challenges to human exceptionalism and the reconceptualisations of how we "do" nature in practice. This module will examine how ideas of nature underpin approaches to environmental problems and the conceptualisation of human-nonhuman relations. With particular focus on the spatial practices of humans and nonhumans, students will explore the contested boundaries between social and natural worlds, and investigate how recent thinking has challenged the formation of both nature and culture. In this module students will learn how nature resists easy classification, yet is instrumental in establishing the politics of environmental policy and hierarchies of value in conservation practices and biodiversity loss. The module will also encourage students to investigate and practice alternative geographies of nature that may promise more sustainable ecological futures.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm
  • Semester 2: Weeks 16: Tuesday 2 pm - 3 pm

Contemporary India: Politics, society and the economyGEG6129Semester 16Yes

Contemporary India: Politics, society and the economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Philippa Williams
Overlap: GEG6120
Prerequisite: None

The module examines significant shifts in South Asian politics, development and society with a particular focus on India. Students will cover nationalism and the "invention" of India, the politics of violence and nonviolence on the sub-continent, processes of economic liberalisation and development in India and its Diaspora. More specifically the module will encourage students to engage with questions concerning: everyday experiences of violence and nonviolence with respect to Hindu nationalism, and Islamist activism in a post 9/11 world; the rise of the middle classes, India¿s cities and citizenship experiences; processes of development including the role of the state and civil society/political society; the nature of political and social transformation in light of caste policies of affirmative action and experiences of education and (un/under)employment and finally the South Asian Diaspora and everyday life in the UK. Throughout the module students will be introduced to different theoretical approaches used by South Asian scholars such as feminist and postcolonial frameworks.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm
  • Semester 1: Weeks 5, 6, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 1 pm - 3 pm

Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, EconomyGEG6130Semester 26Yes

Geopolitics post-9/11: War, Security, Economy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Reid-Henry
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Subsequent to the introductory lecture, the module is divided into three sections. The first main section provides an historical and political overview of the 'war on terror' in relation to thinking about other types of wars. It considers how the prosecution of the war on terror has come to shape not only military, but also legal and governmental discourse and practice in the post 9/11 era. The second section invites students to consider ideas and practices of security as a central feature of this. It will consider the rise of private military contracting, immigration, humanitarianism, urban geopolitics, and the overlap between health and security concerns. The third section focuses on the political-economic underpinnings of many of these developments and challenges students to think of conflict as an embedded social phenomenon: as much a part of contemporary discourses on the economy as it is something with merely economic implications. The final, concluding lecture will examine alternatives to the dominant framings of modern conflict that have been put forward and critiqued thus far.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Wednesday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 16: Wednesday 10 am - 11 am

Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS)GEG6132Semester 16No

Advanced Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Konstantinos Melachroinos
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5102

This module explores advanced issues in relation to the principles, techniques and applications of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) within the wider geographical remit (e.g. advanced spatial analysis, location-allocation models, interoperability and exchange of data between different systems, etc.). It complements the GIS training offered in levels 4 and 5 of and provides an opportunity to students to consolidate and expand their knowledge about GIS.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Monday 1 pm - 2 pm
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Geographies of DemocracyGEG6133Semester 26Yes

Geographies of Democracy

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Jane Wills
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will explore the geographies of democracy and related debates about the democracy of geography as a discipline. The module will start by looking at what we mean by democracy (demos-kratos/people-power), the history of the idea and related practices, the different forms of democracy (direct/representative and newer debates about deliberative democracy and post democracy), the role of political parties and importantly, the importance of geography to these developments. The module will explicate the wider connections to politics and political philosophy (looking at republicanism, liberalism and communitarianism) with particular focus on British political historical-geography. In the latter parts of the module the focus will turn to contemporary challenges including the democratic deficit, rebuilding parties and populism, active citizenship and community organising. In parallel, the module will explore the way in which the discipline of geography (as manifest in universities and schools) has been subject to currents for democratic change in relation to subject matter, research methods, teaching methods and public engagement.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 20.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Geography, Technology and SocietyGEG6134Semester 26No

Geography, Technology and Society

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kerry Holden
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module will develop students' critical engagement with the geographies of knowledge, technology and society. The module will discuss the theoretical and conceptual fabric of geographies of science, paying close attention to its development through studies in the history and sociology of science and Science & Technology Studies (STS). It will then apply these theoretical and conceptual tools to understanding a select number of case study examples of hubs of scientific innovation in the life sciences and Information and Communication Technology (ICT).

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 12 pm - 2 pm

Religion, Belief and SpaceGEG6135Semester 16Yes

Religion, Belief and Space

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Caron Lipman
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module offers an overview of the ways in which social and cultural geographers are contributing a spatial understanding of the practices and ideas of religion and belief. This important and emerging field of enquiry is responding to questions arising from the growing complexity and variety of religious landscapes ¿ particularly within urban centres and suburbs ¿ as a result of migration and social mobility. The module will consider key theoretical debates and developing themes, including the idea of post-secularisation, the development of alternative forms of spirituality, knowledge and experience, and the ways in which everyday spaces are being `implicated in religious meaning-making¿ to enhance and also challenge `religious life, beliefs, practices and identities¿ (Kong, 2010). The module will also investigate the role of gender, age and the body in reproducing and challenging religious values and identities, and the different sensuous and affective ways in which the sacred is experienced and reproduced within religious buildings, `sacred sites¿, and beyond. Lastly, it will explore how ethical and spiritual ideas and organisations have become influential in community development, urban social welfare, inter-faith work, and in rethinking culture-nature relations.

Assessment: 50.0% Coursework, 50.0% Examination
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Friday 1 pm - 3 pm

Geographies of Health and PlaceGEG6136Semester 26No

Geographies of Health and Place

Credits: 15.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5113

This module introduces you to the key debates and theories in the geographies of health and place. Upon completion of this module, you will have an understanding the dynamics of the relationship between health and place, and how these vary at different spatial scales and across different socio-political contexts. You will explore global variations in health outcomes; consider regional differences between the Global North and Global South; examine patterns of sub-national variations in health; and, evaluate explanations for these differences ranging from social processes to attributes of the local environment.

Assessment: 70.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Cold EnvironmentsGEG6202Semester 26Yes

Cold Environments

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Sven Lukas
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5206

The module selectively addresses processes active in the glacial and the periglacial environment: glaciogenic (both ice and meltwater) erosion, transport, sedimentation, permafrost and ground ice and their effects on fluvial, aeolian and gravitational processes. For each of these processes the resulting landforms, both in active and in fossil form, will be treated, together with features resulting from converging processes. Examples are drawn from the Arctic, the Antarctic and high mountain ranges, while examples of fossil features are mainly drawn from western Europe.

Assessment: 75.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Monday 4 pm - 6 pm

Environmental HazardsGEG6203Semester 16Yes

Environmental Hazards

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Dave Horne
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Topics will include: specific processes (geophysical, geomorphological, meteorological, and technological) leading to environmental hazards; areas at risk, prediction, probability and risk evaluation; consequences and impacts of hazard events; longer-term consequences (social and economic) of hazards and implications for high-risk areas; hazard mitigation strategies in different parts of the world. The hazards covered may include floods on rivers and coasts, technological / industrial accidents, mining subsidence, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, tornadoes, hurricanes, ENSO events, disease and famine, and extraterrestrial hazards such as meteorite impacts. Differences in hazard preparation and response between MEDCs and LEDCs will be considered.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 30.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Project in Environmental ScienceGEG6212Full year6No

Project in Environmental Science

Credits: 30.0
Contact: Prof Simon Lewis
Overlap: "GEG6000,GEG630"
Prerequisite: GEG5211

An independent project based upon field, and/or laboratory, and/or numerical modelling work within the field of Environmental Science. NB This module is compulsory for all final-year students registered for an Environmental Science degree (F850) and is not available to students registered for any geography degree. By the end of the second term in your second year you will have to put forward a proposal for your topic, you will be allocated a supervisor based on this proposal. The main research takes place during the summer vacation between your second and third years. Any laboratory analysis should be completed by the end of the first semester in your third year. The work should be preceded by an exploratory study during the Easter vacation of your second year. Data analysis and writing up of the project takes place during the first and second terms of your third year. You are expected to meet regularly with your supervisor to discuss the project. The results of your research are presented in a dissertation of not more than 10,000 words. Not open to associate students.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation, .0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Tuesday 9 am - 10 am

Science and Politics of Climate ChangeGEG6214Semester 26Yes

Science and Politics of Climate Change

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Simon Carr
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module examines one of the most contentious issues facing society in the 21st Century. The module studies the operation of the global climate system, with an emphasis on different aspects of human intervention, and possible implications for changing climates. This module investigates how climate change is (mis-)communicated by primary scientists, politicians, businesses, individuals and communities, and how climate change is used as a geopolitical tool to influence decision-making at individual to supra-national scales.

Assessment: 50.0% Examination, 25.0% Coursework, 25.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Advanced Research and Practice in Environmental ScienceGEG6216Full year6No

Advanced Research and Practice in Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module is designed to develop advanced skills in Environmental Science Research and Practice, in order to prepare students for the Independent Research Project at Level 7 and employment beyond Queen Mary. The module enables students to:
(i) develop project ideas for their Level 7 Independent Research Project.
(ii) develop the research design for the Independent Research Project.
(iii) undertake a critical review of methodological approaches within a relevant scientific field, contributing to the development of the research design for the Independent Research Project and developing writing skills in relation to the synthesis and effective communication of advanced scientific and/or technical information.
(iv) produce a detailed project plan and timetable, together with full risk assessment covering any field and laboratory work to be undertaken as part of the Independent Research Project.
(v) explore potential future career paths.
(vi) develop their ability to effectively communicate their skills and experience in relation to employment criteria.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

Integrated Catchment ManagementGEG6218Semester 26Yes

Integrated Catchment Management

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kate Heppell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Flood risk is increasing at the same time as our rising demand for water. And European legislation, now transposed into UK law, also requires our rivers to achieve good ecological status. There is growing recognition by environmental policy makers and managers that floods, low flows and water quality need to be managed in an integrated way if sustainable solutions are to be found. This module builds on the knowledge of catchment-scale processes gained from GEG5203 Earth System Cycles and applies this knowledge to the practical management of the water environment. Students will gain an understanding of: the issues facing managers of water resources and the water environment; the legislative and policy drivers for management; and the latest approaches being implemented to achieve sustainable and integrated management in the catchment context.

Assessment: 60.0% Examination, 40.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Monday 9 am - 11 am
  • Semester 2: Weeks 16: Monday 10 am - 11 am

Environmental Management ApplicationsGEG6219Semester 16No

Environmental Management Applications

Credits: 30.0
Contact: To Be Confirmed
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: GEG5203 GEG5206

This module will build on fundamental process based learning that students will have developed through either GEG5203 or GEG5206, applying this knowledge to a range of management issues. The module will be based around seminars which introduce students to methods, concepts and frameworks for environmental monitoring, assessment and restoration followed by a field trip to S. Florida. On the field trip students will explore the physical, environmental, political and economic issues surrounding a range of restoration and management schemes in S. Florida which may include fluvial (e.g. Kissimmee River), terrestrial (e.g. the Everglades), estuarine (e.g. Tampa Bay), coastal (barrier Gulf Coast) and marine (e.g. Florida Bay and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary) environments. During the field trip students will meet with a range of end-users, stakeholders and practitioners working in Environmental Management. As part of the assessment process students will produce a concise fact sheet aimed at A level/first year students and lead a question and answer session on a specialised topic with their peers and professionals. Compulsory UK based fieldwork in the School of Geography is undertaken at no extra cost. Optional overseas fieldwork in the second and third year ranges from £400 to £1,200 approximately, some with additional flight costs. These figures are based on costs in the year 2016/17 but the overall cost will fluctuate each year. Destinations can vary year-on-year, are subject to availability and are dependent on the module combinations chosen. Overseas field trip modules run in alternate years. Places on some field trip modules are limited. If field trip modules are oversubscribed, places are allocated by ballot. Students participating in overseas field trips are responsible for securing their own visas, if required.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Weeks 1: Tuesday 4 pm - 5 pm
  • Semester 2: Tuesday 2 pm - 4 pm

Progress in Physical Geography and Environmental ScienceGEG6221Semester 26No

Progress in Physical Geography and Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Kate Spencer
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students will work independently to identify, research and review a wide range of contemporary, primary literature in a chosen area of Environmental Science or Physical Geography. Through a series of small group seminars students will be given the opportunity to discuss and present their findings to both their peers and a member of academic staff. Through these seminars they will also receive feedback on their work.

Broad research themes will be identified at the beginning of the semester (during module registration and advising) to reflect the research interests and expertise of staff available to lead seminars. Students will select a theme within which they can choose their own research topic and will be allocated to a seminar group. The seminars are either staff or student led. In order to benefit from these seminars students must prepare for them in advance and be prepared to critically discuss their peers¿ work.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: Thursday 2 pm - 4 pm

Geo-ecology and Geo-ecosystemsGEG6222Semester 16Yes

Geo-ecology and Geo-ecosystems

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Prof Lisa Belyea
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Geo-ecology is an interdisciplinary science that studies organisms, air, water and land as interacting components of a single geo-ecosystem. A central tenet is that components of the system must be considered in relation to one another and to the larger whole, rather than in isolation. Geo-ecosystems are 'messy' and cause-and-effect is often cyclical rather than linear. In this module, we will examine selected topics in this field, taking a practical approach through the use of spatial data and models. You will learn how to analyse spatial patterns in the landscape and to investigate the underlying processes and interactions. Developing this approach of `systems thinking¿ is vital to understanding and, where possible, managing environmental issues.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 1: Thursday 10 am - 11 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 1: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Terrestrial Vegetation ModellingGEG6223Semester 26No

Terrestrial Vegetation Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The terrestrial biosphere acts as a sink for carbon in the atmosphere and is thought to be currently absorbing around one quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. Models of terrestrial vegetation functioning can be used to estimate how much carbon is currently being absorbed, and how this might change with climate change. Such models are constructed using many sub-processes which control their behaviour and sensitivities. Model predictions can be compared with multiple independent data sources to assess their performance. In this module you will learn how vegetation models work and how they can be used to make predictions under climate change scenarios. You will learn strong analytical, computational and statistical skills, as well as techniques for visualisation.

Assessment: 90.0% Coursework, 10.0% Practical
Level: 6
Timetable:

    Lecture
  • Semester 2: Thursday 9 am - 10 am
    IT Class
  • Semester 2: Weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12: Thursday 12 pm - 2 pm

Desk StudyGEG705USemester 27Yes

Desk Study

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module provides an opportunity for students to research and acquire in-depth knowledge of a contemporary environmental science issue or specialised area of environmental science not covered in the taught programme. Students select their own research topic, subject to consultation with and approval by the module organiser. Module supervision is provided on an individual basis by the most appropriate member of physical geography staff.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Individual Research ProjectGEG708UFull year7Yes

Individual Research Project

Credits: 45.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students are encouraged to undertake their Individual Research Project in collaboration with a practitioner / user organisation. The theme for the Individual Research Project is selected by the student in collaboration with the module organiser and, where appropriate, with the practitioner organisation in order to ensure that the project and practitioner link matches the research interests and career aspirations of the student. Students not wishing to link with a practitioner organisation can opt to undertake a free-standing research project of their choice, subject to approval by the module organiser. In either case, the project is undertaken between Semester B of Level 6 and Semester B of Level 7, allowing the main research to be completed during the summer vacation between Levels 6 and 7. Each student is allocated an academic advisor from the MSci academic staff to ensure that they receive appropriate academic guidance during the research.

Assessment: 100.0% Dissertation
Level: 7
Timetable:

Field Methods for Freshwater Environmental ScienceGEG709UFull year7No

Field Methods for Freshwater Environmental Science

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Gemma Harvey
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Physical Modelling of Fluvial ProcessesGEG710USemester 27Yes

Physical Modelling of Fluvial Processes

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module provides students with the opportunity to design and conduct a project involving physical modelling of fluvial processes in an experimental laboratory setting. The project will make use of the School of Geography's Hydraulics and Sediment Transport Laboratory which includes a Sediment Transport Demonstration Channel designed to allow students to study open channel hydraulics and sediment transport, and a River Flow Simulator designed for investigations into channel morphology. Students will, through discussion with a supervisor, design a project that addresses a contemporary research question in fluvial geomorphology. They will organise laboratory time to use the required hydraulics facilities, conduct physical manipulations of fluvial processes, measure outcomes, analyse resulting data sets and present their findings in a concise report. They will also present their findings at a mini-symposium to be held within the Physical Geography Group seminar series.

Assessment: 70.0% Coursework, 30.0% Practical
Level: 7
Timetable:

Biogeosciences and ecosystem servicesGEG713USemester 27Yes

Biogeosciences and ecosystem services

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Kate Heppell
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module explores biogeochemical processes at the catchment level, with reference to the broader context of global climate and land use change. Major themes include interactions among the biogeochemical cycles; the linkages of biogeochemistry with sediment dynamics and hydrological processes; and climate change and land use effects on biogeochemical processes in floodplains, rivers and estuaries. The module introduces methods of field sample collection and laboratory analysis; and approaches to controlling pollutants, nutrient levels and greenhouse gas emissions in aquatic systems.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Flood Risk Management and ModellingGEG714USemester 27Yes

Flood Risk Management and Modelling

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

The module is divided into two linked elements. The first explores the current status of flood risk and associated legislation in the UK and Europe. Flood generation mechanisms are examined and novel management options for reducing flood risk (including strategic rural land management and Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems) are critically reviewed. Flood protection in London is explored through a field trip to the Thames Barrier and potential impacts of predicted changes in climate and socio-economic conditions on UK flood risk are reviewed. The second component of the module is focussed on flood risk modelling. A combination of lecture and practical sessions are used to introduce students to design discharge estimation methods, flood frequency analysis and 1D inundation modelling using industry standard software.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

River Assessment and RestorationGEG717USemester 17Yes

River Assessment and Restoration

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Alexander Henshaw
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

This module aims to provide the key knowledge and understanding at an advanced level necessary to support the development of management strategies for rivers along the catchment to coast continuum. Based upon an understanding of the multi-dimensional connectivity of fluvial systems, the module focuses on themes such as sediment and vegetation dynamics, river and floodplain process-form relationships, environmental flows, ecohydraulics and particular issues relating to constrained urban environments. Based on a solid scientific underpinning, the module introduces the legislative context, methods of field survey and assessment, and integrated approaches to the sustainable management of river systems, their flood plains and estuaries.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

Data AnalysisGEG725USemester 17Yes

Data Analysis

Credits: 15.0
Contact: Dr Emily Lines
Overlap: None
Prerequisite: None

Students of Physical Geography and Environmental Science require a range of numerical, statistical land modelling skills to undertake higher-level analysis of environmental datasets. This module provides specific training and experience in specific approaches to data analysis relevant to individual students or groups of students. This will include one-to-one or small group workshops on specific statistical methods, but the precise content of the teaching will be specific to the needs of the cohort in each year.

Assessment: 100.0% Coursework
Level: 7
Timetable:

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